Beat Club Edition

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The "Swinging Sixties"

In the early 1960s, a culture developed in the Bay Area, which turned away from the fashion of the time as the Beatniks and historical models. Victorian clothing and folk music became popular. Formative are The Charlatans, in whose environment Janis Joplin moved to San Francisco. Added to this was the culture of LSD users, as developed in the form of acid test and the Merry Pranksters to Ken Kesey as a further factor. The Charlatans and the friendly The Family Dog invented in the summer of 1965 on a joint tour to Virginia City, Nevada a style of music and dance later called psychedelic.

In the winter of 65/66 emerged the first large, multi-day parties and festivals in San Francisco, on which the hitherto scattered supporters met, formed a common subculture and gained strength. The graphic designer Wes Wilson invented for posters to these parties graphic forms, from which the psychedelic art was created. At the parties played for the first time musicians who then founded the band Jefferson Airplane. The year 1966 marked the culture. In protest against the Vietnam War a revival of anarchism arose.

The civil rights movement of African Americans had spawned the Black Panther Party. There were offshoots of culture in other cities, such as New York City, where the musical Hair emerged and a similar subculture thrived in the East Village district. In October 1966, an open-air "love-pageant rally" took place in Haight-Ashbury, gathering thousands of young people.

The term Summer of Love refers to the summer of 1967, when the so-called hippie movement in the United States reached its peak. It is often mistakenly assumed that the "Summer of Love" marks the summer of 1969, when the Woodstock Festival took place. The term attempts to describe the lifestyle that prevailed in the summer of 1967 in San Francisco, California. An example of this is the song San Francisco, sung by Scott McKenzie, written by John Phillips, vocalist of The Mamas and the Papas

The "Summer of Love" 

In the early 1960s, a culture developed in the Bay Area, which turned away from the fashion of the time as the Beatniks and historical models. Victorian clothing and folk music became popular. Formative are The Charlatans, in whose environment Janis Joplin moved to San Francisco. Added to this was the culture of LSD users, as developed in the form of acid test and the Merry Pranksters to Ken Kesey as a further factor. The Charlatans and the friendly The Family Dog invented in the summer of 1965 on a joint tour to Virginia City, Nevada a style of music and dance later called psychedelic.

In the winter of 65/66 emerged the first large, multi-day parties and festivals in San Francisco, on which the hitherto scattered supporters met, formed a common subculture and gained strength. The graphic designer Wes Wilson invented for posters to these parties graphic forms, from which the psychedelic art was created. At the parties played for the first time musicians who then founded the band Jefferson Airplane. The year 1966 marked the culture. In protest against the Vietnam War a revival of anarchism arose.

The civil rights movement of African Americans had spawned the Black Panther Party. There were offshoots of culture in other cities, such as New York City, where the musical Hair emerged and a similar subculture thrived in the East Village district. In October 1966, an open-air "love-pageant rally" took place in Haight-Ashbury, gathering thousands of young people.

The term Summer of Love refers to the summer of 1967, when the so-called hippie movement in the United States reached its peak. It is often mistakenly assumed that the "Summer of Love" marks the summer of 1969, when the Woodstock Festival took place. The term attempts to describe the lifestyle that prevailed in the summer of 1967 in San Francisco, California. An example of this is the song San Francisco, sung by Scott McKenzie, written by John Phillips, vocalist of The Mamas and the Papas:

"If you're going to San Francisco, be sure to wear some flowers in your hair. If you come to San Francisco, Summertime wants to be a love-in there. "
- Scott McKenzie: San Francisco, 1967

The cultural highlight of the Summer of Love was the Monterey International Pop Festival from 16 to 18 June 1967. Death of a Hippie can be seen as the end of the Summer of Love on October 6, 1967, when a hippie symbolically buried her has been. The organizers protested against the fact that the people - caused by the media - the hippie's only imitated and no longer felt.

„Don’t do it because someone else is doing it. Do it because that’s how you feel about it.“[5]

Just one year ago, LSD was declared illegal.

SOURCES:

  1. Hochspringen↑ Sheila Weller: Suddenly That Summer, Vanity Fair, Juni 2012
  2. Hochspringen↑http://www.diggers.org/history.htm
  3. Hochspringen↑ Derek Taylor It was twenty Years ago Today S.181, 1987 Bantam Press, ISBN 0-593-01269-0
  4. Hochspringen↑ GEO Special: San Francisco 1988, ISBN 3-570-02824-0
  5. Hochspringen↑ Derek Taylor It was twenty Years ago Today S. 243, 1987 Bantam Press, ISBN 0-593-01269-0